diversity 101 = pluriverse

TINA in intensive care!  As the mono-isms of productivism are dissolving in the financialised toxicities of poverty and pollution a pluriverse of alternative diversity is waiting to take wings … A POST-DEVELOPMENT DICTIONARY  Edited by ASHISH KOTHARI, ARIEL SALLEH, ARTURO ESCOBAR, FEDERICO DEMARIA, ALBERTO ACOSTA –  read or download PLURIVERSE PDF here


    endorsements

  • A way to understanding an alternative future. – Juliet Schor, Sociology, Boston College
  • A book of dazzling breadth, provocative and persuasive scholarship. – Sylvia Marcos, Mexican feminist activist and scholar
  • For too long the North has imposed its one-size-fits-all agenda on the South. – Dan O’Neill, economist, University of Leeds
  • This Dictionary charts pathways for transition to an ecologically sane, politically more egalitarian, and socially more inclusive world. – Erik Swyngedouw, geographer, University of Manchester
  • A real breakthrough in post-development thinking. – Gilbert Rist, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
  • It is about a future that died long ago . . . and about the urgency of nurturing the manifold worlds that breathe seditiously. – Bayo Akomolafe, author of These Wilds Beyond Our Fences
  • A delight: stimulating, important. – John Holloway, author of Change the World Without Taking Power
  • May the Pluriverse open our minds to what we could not see. . . . – Frances Moore Lappé, founder of the Small Planet Institute
  • This Post-Development Dictionary addresses the systemic crisis we are living in by honouring cultural visions from all over the world. – Pablo Solon, co-author of Systemic Alternatives
  • A wild generosity of ideas marks this book. It is a gift to celebrate and gossip about. – Shiv Visvanathan, Jindal Global University
  • Calls out the free-market economic delusion that the imperative for survival demands. – Mogobe Ramose, author of African Philosophy Through Ubuntu
  • Pluriverse helps us to re-think our societies and the meaning of being human. – Jingzhong Ye, Humanities, China Agricultural University
  • A valuable contribution towards building a counter-epistemic community. – Debal Deb, author of Beyond Developmentality
  • Development as a solution to global crises has long been criticized but a plethora of alternatives exist. – Saral Sarkar, author of Eco-Socialism or Eco-Capitalism?
  • A menu of narratives that supply meaning and nurture hope. – Marina Fischer-Kowalski, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
  • Whether you agree with the wisdom of plurality or not, this book will leave you thinking about radical social transformations. – Lourdes Beneria, Regional Planning, Cornell University
  • This book’s magnificent content puts forth real possibilities for building a future where we can live in peace with each other and the planet. – Medea Benjamin, Co-Director, CODEPINK: Women for Peace
  • This strategic move towards a pluriverse destabilizes the claim to one universal knowledge as disseminated by modernist development. – Susan Paulson, University of Florida
  • There are many alternatives to the domineering, profiteering, globalizing, disempowering ‘progress’ of the West. – Richard Norgaard, author of Development Betrayed
  • Contributions from a multiplicity of thoughtful and creative minds define the path forward. – David Korten, author of When Corporations Rule the World
  • In this essential compendium, diverse visionaries offer both answers and inspirations. – Paul Raskin, founding president of the Tellus Institute
  • In a critical time for humanity, this volume fills a need in our knowledge. – John Foran, climate activist
  • An experimental vocabulary in movement about what comes after and beyond the trap of ‘development’. – Verónica Gago, Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Buenos Aires
  • This compilation of ideas and practices helps us to rethink development. – Diana Gómez, anthropologist, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá
  • A much welcome contribution to debates on development. – Raquel Gutiérrez Aguilar, author of The Rhythm of the Pachakuti
  • A look at the remarkable spectrum of experiences, proposals and radical knowledge that challenge the contemporary crisis of civilization. – Edgardo Lander, Venezuelan Central University, Caracas
  • Homogenization is the name of our civilizational malaise. – Antonio Elizalde, Director, Polis: Latin American Journal of Sustainability, Chile
  • The time is overdue to unsettle the cognitive supremacy of the West. – Nina Pacari, Kechwa indigenous leader
  • The spatial-temporal weaving of the Pluriverse inscribes each of our bodies with unique synchronicities as we participate in the existential cycles of living matter. – Raúl Prada Alcoreza, Bolivian writer, demographer, member of Comuna
  • This search enables us to bring many ‘dispersed strengths’ into a single ray of light illuminating the analysis and processes of change. – Gioconda Belli, Nicaragua
  • A verse is needed to express a wish, to push for change, to eradicate injustices. All of these verses and more are gathered in this book. – Gustavo Duch, Catalonian writer, food sovereignty activist, horticulturist apprentice
  • Through ‘the cracks’, people been able to build life-alternatives to extractive models and construct new worlds characterized by non-capitalist forms of life. – Raúl Zibechi, Uruguayian writer, popular educator and journalist
  • Absolutely thrilling. Despite the limit of 1000 words, each entry in this Dictionary manages to exhibit an amazing capacity for synthesis and creativity on the authors’ part. – Jûrgen Schuldt, economist, Universidad del Pacífico, Lima

https://gaiamoney.files.wordpress.com/2021/04/plurivers-full-book-09-05-2019.pdf

contents

Foreword: The Development Dictionary Revisited WOLFGANG SACHS
Introduction: Finding Pluriversal Paths A KOTHARI etal

DEVELOPMENT AND ITS CRISES: GLOBAL EXPERIENCES

Breaking the Chains of Development NNIMMO BASSEY 3
Development – for the 1 per cent VANDANA SHIVA 6
Maldevelopment JOSÉ MARÍA TORTOSA 9
The Development Project PHILIP MCMICHAEL 12
Oceania’s Kastom Ekonomi KIRK HUFFMAN 15
The Latin American Critique of Development MARISTELLA SVAMPA 18

UNIVERSALIZING THE EARTH: REFORMIST SOLUTIONS
BRICS – ANA GARCIA and PATRICK BOND 25
Circular Economy GIACOMO D’ALISA 28
Climate-Smart Agriculture TERESA ANDERSON 31
Development Aid JEREMY GOULD 34
Digital Tools GEORGE C. CAFFENTZIS 37
Earth System Governance ARIEL SALLEH 40
Ecomodernism SAM BLISS and GIORGOS KALLIS 43
Ecosystem Service Trading LARRY LOHMANN 47
Efficiency DEEPAK MALGHAN 50
Geo-Engineering SILVIA RIBEIRO 53
Green Economy ULRICH BRAND and MIRIAM LANG 56
Lifeboat Ethics JOHN P. CLARK 59
Neo-Extractivism SAMANTHA HARGREAVES 62
Reproductive Engineering RENATE KLEIN 65
Smart Cities HUG MARCH 68
Sustainable Development ERIK GÓMEZ-BAGGETHUN 71
Transhumanism LUKE NOVAK 74

A PEOPLE’S PLURIVERSE: TRANSFORMATIVE INITIATIVES
Agaciro ERIC NS. NDUSHABANDI and OLIVIA U. RUTAZIBWA 79
Agdals PABLO DOMINGUEZ and GARY J. MARTIN 82
Agroecology VICTOR M. TOLEDO 85
Alter-Globalization Movement GEOFFREY PLEYERS 89
Alternative Currencies PETER NORTH 92
Arbitration for Sovereign Debt OSCAR UGARTECHE GALARZA 95
Autonomy GUSTAVO ESTEVA 99
Biocivilization CÂNDIDO GRZYBOWSKI 102
Body Politics WENDY HARCOURT 105
Buddhism and Wisdom-based Compassion GESHE DORJI DAMDUL 108
Buen Vivir MÓNICA CHUJI, GRIMALDO RENGIFO, EDUARDO GUDYNAS 111
Chinese Religions LIANG YONGJIA 114
Christian Eco-Theology FR. SEÁN MCDONAGH 118
Civilizational Transitions ARTURO ESCOBAR 121
Commons MASSIMO DE ANGELIS 124
Community Economies J.K. GIBSON-GRAHAM 127
Comunalidad ARTURO GUERRERO OSORIO 130
Convivialism ALAIN CAILLÉ 133
Conviviality DAVID BARKIN 136
Cooperative Ecosystems ENRIC DURAN GIRALT 139
Country ANNE POELINA 142
Deep Ecology JOHN SEED 145
Degrowth FEDERICO DEMARIA, SERGE LATOUCHE 148
Democratic Economy in Kurdistan AZIZE ASLAN, BENGI AKBULUT 151
Direct Democracy CHRISTOS ZOGRAFOS 154
Earth Spirituality CHARLES EISENSTEIN 157
Eco-Anarchism TED TRAINER 160
Ecofeminism CHRISTELLE TERREBLANCHE 163
Ecology of Culture EKATERINA CHERTKOVSKAYA 166
Eco-Positive Design JANIS BIRKELAND 169
Eco-Socialism MICHAEL LÖWY 172
Ecovillages MARTHA CHAVES 175
Energy Sovereignty DANIELA DEL BENE, J P SOLER , TATIANA ROA 178
Environmental Justice JOAN MARTINEZ-ALIER 182
Food Sovereignty LAURA GUTIÉRREZ ESCOBAR 185
Free Software HARRY HALPIN 188
Gift Economy SIMONE WÖRER 191
Gross National Happiness Bhutan JULIEN-FRANÇOIS GERBER 194
Hinduism and Social Transformation VASUDHA NARAYANAN 197
Human Rights MILOON KOTHARI 200
Hurai YUXIN HOU 203
Ibadism MABROUKA M’BAREK 205
ICCAs – Territories of Life G BORRINI-FEYERABEND, M. TAGHI FARVAR 208
Islamic Ethics NAWAL AMMAR 212
Jain Ecology SATISH KUMAR 214
Judaic Tikkun Olam RABBI MICHAEL LERNER 217
Kametsa Asaike EMILY CARUSO, J P SARMIENTO BARLETTI 220
Kawsak Sacha PATRICIA GUALINGA 223
Kyosei MOTOI FUSE 226
Latin American and Caribbean Feminisms B R LOZANO LERMA 228
Liberation Theology ELINA VUOLA 231
Life Projects MARIO BLASER 234
Mediterraneanism ONOFRIO ROMANO 237
Minobimaatisiiwin DEBORAH MCGREGOR 240
Nature Rights CORMAC CULLINAN 243
Nayakrishi Andolon FARHAD MAZHAR 247
Negentropic Production ENRIQUE LEFF 250
New Matriarchies CLAUDIA VON WERLHOF 253
New Water Paradigm JAN POKORNÝ 256
Open Localization GIORGOS VELEGRAKIS and EIRINI GAITANOU 259
Pacific Feminisms YVONNE UNDERHILL-SEM 262
Pacifism MARCO DERIU 265
Peacewomen LAU KIN CHI 268
Pedagogy JONATHAN DAWSON 271
Permaculture TERRY LEAHY 274
Popular Solidarity Economy NATALIA QUIROGA DÍAZ 277
Post-Economia ALBERTO ACOSTA 280
Prakritik Swaraj ASEEM SHRIVASTAVA 283
Queer Love ARVIND NARRAIN 286
Radical Ecological Democracy ASHISH KOTHARI 289
Revolution EDUARDO GUDYNAS 293
Rural Reconstruction SIT TSUI 296
Sea Ontologies KARIN AMIMOTO INGERSOLL 299
Sentipensar PATRICIA BOTERO GÓMEZ 302
Slow Movement MICHELLE BOULOUS WALKER 305
Social Ecology BRIAN TOKAR 308
Social Solidarity Economy N JOHANISOVA and M VINKELHOFEROVÁ 311
Tao Worldview SUTEJ HUGU 314
Transition Movement ROB HOPKINS 317
Tribunal on the Rights of Nature RAMIRO ÁVILA-SANTAMARÍA 320
Ubuntu LESLEY LE GRANGE 323
Undeveloping the North ARAM ZIAI 326
Wages for Housework SILVIA FEDERICI 329
Worker-Led Production THEODOROS KARYOTIS 332
Zapatista Autonomy XOCHITL LEYVA-SOLANO 335


Postscript: The Global Tapestry of Alternatives

The world is going through an unprecedented crisis engendered by a dominant regime that has resulted in deepening inequalities, increasing in new forms of deprivation, the destruction of ecosystems, climate change,
the tearing off of social fabric and the dispossession of all living beings with immense violence. However, the past two decades have witnessed the emergence of an immense variety of radical alternatives to this dominant regime and to its roots in capitalist, patriarchal, racist, statist, and anthropocentric forces. These range from initiatives in specific sectors such as sustainable and holistic agriculture, community-led water/energy/food sovereignty, solidarity and sharing economy, worker control of production facilities, resource/knowledge commons, and inter-ethnic peace and harmony, to more holistic or rounded transformations such as those being attempted by the Zapatista in Chiapas and the Kurds in Rojava, to the revival of ancient traditions or the emergence of new worldviews that re-establish humanity’s place within nature and the values of human dignity, equality and the respect of history.

The Global Tapestry of Alternatives is an initiative seeking to create solidarity networks and strategic alliance amongst all these alternatives on local, regional and global levels. It starts in the local interaction among
alternatives, to gradually organize forms of agreement on the regional, national and global scale, through diverse and light structures, defined in each space, horizontal, democratic, inclusive and non-centralized, using
diverse local languages and other ways of communicating. The initiative has no central structure or control mechanisms. It spreads step by step as an ever-expanding, complex set of tapestries, constructed by already existing communal or collective webs, organized as alternatives to the dominant regimes, each of them autonomously weaving itself with other such webs. It organizes mechanisms of interaction between those regional and national structures and with the societies, in which they exist, in diverse languages and different means, promoting periodically regional, national and global encounters, when the conditions allow for them, as well as close and synergistic linkages with existing organizations, like the World Social Forum.

The Global Tapestry of Alternatives is about creating spaces of collaboration and exchange, in order to learn about and from each other, critically challenge each other, offer active solidarity to each other whenever needed, interweave the initiatives in common actions, give them visibility to inspire other people to create their own initiatives and to go further along existing paths or forge new ones that strengthen alternatives wherever they are, until the point in which a critical mass of alternative ways can create the conditions for the radical systemic changes we need. A small group of activists from several regions of the world started the initiative, which will create its structure as it takes shape in different parts of the world. The initial group will continue supporting the initiative as long as necessary. It has some endorsers who subscribe this document, and will try to weave itself with similar initiatives around the world.


Anyone interested email  globaltapestryofalternatives@riseup.net.

For more information, browse  www.globaltapestryofalternatives.org.

Detailed comments at  www.thepluriverse.org. 

PLURIVERSE PDF here


articles


academia.edu GM pdf    4/2021  Paradigm War: A Distinct Indigenous Vision   by Navaneeta Majumder

….” Anthropology and Indigenous populations have seen a debate between nature and culture.This has a bearing on the on-going paradigm war, as witnessed in the 21st century. In the late19th century, indigenous populations were seen as being unable to distinguish between na-ture and culture, or a monolithic world-view. French structuralism of the middle 20th centuryeventually concluded that this premise was false and that Indigenous societies could differentiate between nature and culture. (Ouellette, 2010) But Descola, has contested the dualism between nature and culture, as a result, once again, the Indigenous people no longer see the difference between the both.

In the first chapter of the Beyond Nature and Culture,“The Figures of Continuities”, Descola shows, that in other cosmologies, everywhere in the world, the frontiers between human and objects are imprecise or even absent….

This situation aptly describes the concept of ‘paradigm wars’, i.e. a world view basedon opposite understandings of how human beings should live on Earth. The primary motive for targeting natives by multinational corporations rises from the fact that indigenous people were successful over millennia, upholding their cultures, economics world views and practice, which are not built on the idea of geo-economics.This paradigm has been aptly dealt by both Anne Waters and Mander in their respective edited books on Indigenous vision. To understand the issue in detail, the example of ‘bio-colonialism’ is quite appropriate.

This Debra Harry calls a ‘High-Tech Invasion’. History of indigenous struggle depicts the amount of exploitation faced by native people for natural resources, animals and cultures, as these has been rendered as commodities, i.e. how native land and culture has been commodifed by the Westerners. But now a new form of mode of invasion, has arrived, known as ‘bio-prospecting’. It is being used by transnational corporations for privatizing and monopolizing genetic structures, cell lines of native plants, seeds and even people. This search for genetic resources for economic gains have led to the development of a new form of colonialism, known as ‘bio-colonialism’.”…


see also >


 

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Nnimmo Bassey, Vandana Shiva, José María Tortosa, Philip Mcmichael, Kirk Huffman, Maristella Svampa ,
Brics Ana Garcia, Patrick Bond, Giacomo D’alisa, Teresa Anderson, Jeremy Gould , G C Caffentzis, Ariel Salleh , Sam Bliss , Giorgos Kallis, Larry Lohmann, Silvia Ribeiro, Ulrich Brand, Miriam Lang, John P. Clark, Samantha Hargreaves, Renate Klein ,Hug March, Erik Gómez-Baggethun, Luke Novak,  Eric Ns. Ndushabandi, Olivia U. Rutazibwa, A P Dominguez, Gary J. Martin, Victor M. Toledo, Geoffrey Pleyers , Peter North, Oscar Ugarteche Galarza , Gustavo Esteva, Cândido Grzybowski, Wendy Harcourt, Geshe Dorji Damdul, Mónica Chuji, Grimaldo Rengifo, Eduardo Gudynas , Liang Yongjia , Fr. Seán Mcdonagh ,Arturo Escobar , De Angelis , J.k. Gibson-Graham, Arturo Guerrero Osorio , Alain Caillé , David Barkin, Enric Duran Giralt, Anne Poelina ,John Seed ,Federico Demaria , Serge Latouche, Azize Aslan, Bengi Akbulut, Christos Zografos, Charles Eisenstein, Ted Trainer, Christelle Terreblanche , Ekaterina Chertkovskaya , Janis Birkeland ,Michael Löwy,Martha Chaves ,Daniela Del Bene, Juan Pablo Soler ,Tatiana Roa , Joan Martinez-Alier, Laura Gutiérrez Escobar, Harry Halpin, Simone Wörer, Bhutan Julien-François Gerber, Vasudha Narayanan, Miloon Kothari, Yuxin Hou, Mabrouka M’barek,  Grazia Borrini-Feyerabend, M. Taghi Farvar, Nawal Ammar, Satish Kumar,  Michael Lerner, Emily Caruso, J P Sarmiento Barletti, Patricia Gualinga, Motoi Fuse, B R Lozano Lerma, Elina Vuola, Mario Blaser, Onofrio Romano, Deborah Mcgregor ,Cormac Cullinan, Farhad Mazhar , Enrique Leff , Claudia Von Werlhof , Jan Pokorný , Giorgos Velegrakis,Eirini Gaitanou ,Yvonne Underhill-Sem, Marco Deriu , Lau Kin Chi , Jonathan Dawson , Terry Leahy , Natalia Quiroga Díaz ,Alberto Acosta , Aseem Shrivastava , Arvind Narrain ,Ashish Kothari, Eduardo Gudynas , Sit Tsui , Karin Amimoto Ingersoll, Patricia Botero Gómez, Michelle Boulous Walker , Brian Tokar, Nadia Johanisova , Markéta Vinkelhoferová, Sutej Hugu ,Rob Hopkins ,Ramiro Ávila-Santamaría, Lesley Le Grange , Aram Ziai ,Silvia Federici , Theodoros Karyotis , Xochitl Leyva-Solano 

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